Home-page - Numeri
Presentazione
Sezioni bibliografiche
Comitato scientifico
Contatti e indirizzi
Dépliant e cedola acquisti
Links
20 anni di Semicerchio. Indice 1-34
Norme redazionali e Codice Etico
The Journal
Bibliographical Sections
Advisory Board
Contacts & Address
Saggi e testi online
Poesia angloafricana
Poesia angloindiana
Poesia americana (USA)
Poesia araba
Poesia australiana
Poesia brasiliana
Poesia ceca
Poesia cinese
Poesia classica e medievale
Poesia coreana
Poesia finlandese
Poesia francese
Poesia giapponese
Poesia greca
Poesia inglese
Poesia inglese postcoloniale
Poesia iraniana
Poesia ispano-americana
Poesia italiana
Poesia lituana
Poesia macedone
Poesia portoghese
Poesia russa
Poesia serbo-croata
Poesia olandese
Poesia slovena
Poesia spagnola
Poesia tedesca
Poesia ungherese
Poesia in musica (Canzoni)
Comparatistica & Strumenti
Altre aree linguistiche
Visits since 10 July '98

« indietro

VIRGILIO E UNA CRITICA DELL’IMPERIALISMO AMERICANO: LA POESIA DI ROBERT LOWELL
di Nicola Gardini
«I WAS MYSELF»: LOWELL AND VIRGIL
To Francesco Rognoni
Lowell’s classicism is obvious. It is one of the main ingredients of his fixation with ancestry and genealogy, as typically expressed by his family poetry. He took his classicism from Pound, Eliot, and the New Critics – all of whom constituted for him another sort of familial pedigree. However, he hardly ever brought it to as tense a pitch of hybridizing bravura as the founders of modernism. All traces of Avant-garde are effaced from Lowell’s imitative practice. His sense of the self – an experiential one – has always looked for downright correlatives. Weak as it may have become at times, it never became so weak as not to resort to the imitation of stronger models. Therefore, Lowell would never make them disintegrate in the diachronic impersonality of poetic language, as Pound and Eliot would, but borrowed their alleged integrity to survive synchronicity. Also in imitation, he kept faithful to the tenets of his original formalism and opposed deconstruction by asserting the necessity of shape. Then, he personified Catullus, Propertius, Horace, Juvenal, Ovid, and Virgil. What did Lowell’s Latin classicism feed on? In an Interview with Frederick Seidel (1961), he said:
a Roman poet is much less intellectual than the Englishman, much less abstract. He’s nearer nature somehow [...] And yet he’s very sophisticated. [...] Also, you take almost any really good Roman poet – Juvenal, or Vergil, or Propertius, Catullus – he’s much more raw and direct than anything in English, and yet he has a block-like formality. The Roman frankness interests me1.
Virgil was by far the most influential and modeling of all the ancient authors he quoted and felt close to. In fact, I claim thatVirgil helped Lowell shape the whole of his literary career and establish his poetic persona. Lowell’s interest in Virgil encapsulates his broader interest in the myth of Rome, voicing his lifelong obsession with such issues as the poet’s moral mission and the state’s historical responsibility2. References to Roman history appear throughout Lowell’s oeuvre3. For Lowell, America itself was a sort of ‘Roman’ empire – «immense, crass, vital, crushingly powerful», needing poets to justify its corruption and shield its decay4. Likewise, «Rome asked for poets. At her beck and call, / came Lucan, Tacitus and Juvenal ...». These lines come from Beyond the Alpsa poem included both in Life Studies and in For the Union Dead. Interestingly enough, in the revised version of the later book, they are pronounced by Ovid, a world famous victim of imperial propaganda. In Eddins’ words,
speaking himself from the bitterness of political exile, Ovid underscores the irony of the poets’ answer to the mother country’s request that her culture be nourished by literature. They turn savagely upon her corruption and hypocrisy with merciless satires and exposés, dramatizing not only by their revelations but by their very satirical posture the hopeless fragmentation of art, statesmanship, and military power in a society that would like to claim unity of being. The analogous relation between Lowell and the Washington of his day is obvious enough5.
T. S. Eliot’s remarks on Virgil can serve as an apt comment on Lowell’s Virgilian calling:
the consciousness of history. [...] Virgil [...] is at the centre of European civilization, in a position which no other poet can share or usurp. The Roman Empire and the Latin language were not any empire and any language, but an empire and a language with a unique destiny in relation to ourselves; and the poet in whom that Empire and that language came to consciousness and expression is a poet of unique destiny6.
Major critics, starting with Randall Jarrell, described Lowell’s evolution as a progressive departure from constraint to liberty, from history to autobiography. Virgil characterized and set the seal on the main turning points of such an evolution, providing the modern poet with an ever growing consciousness of his own historical significance. Originally, when he was still imbued with bookish classicism, Lowell wanted to be Virgil. Then, as he progressed in the affirmation of his own originality, he wanted to get rid of Virgil. He ultimately succeeded in neither thing. He always regretted – I believe – not becoming an epic poet. What prevented him from fully accomplishing his programme? As J.D. McClatchy put it, «Lowell’s sense of the epic is that it is self-contained, tragic, and dramatic. Now, those are decidedly not Lowell’s own strengths, which tend toward the ironic, the melancholy, the provisional, the lyric. Stephen Yenser proposes that, throughout his career [...], Lowell ‘sought to fulfill an epic ambition with essentially lyric means»7.
The epic was one of Lowell’s lifelong preoccupations – with its demands and capacities, with its cultural prestige, with the kind of status it bestowed on its author. He first wrote an essay on the epic, specifically on the Iliad, at age 18 – finally published in the St. Mark’s school magazine in his senior year there. As a student, he had also worked on a long poem on the first Crusade. He told Seidel: «I’d gone to call on Frost with a huge epic on the First Crusade, all written out in clumsy longhand on lined paper. He read a page of that and said, ‘You have no compression’»8. At the time of his death, he was working on an essay titled Epics.
As a poet, Lowell starts dealing with Virgil as early as his first book, Lord Weary’s Castle. The poem The Death of the Sheriff takes its epigraph from Aeneid II, 506 – a line introducing the tragic episode of Priam’s massacre – and, in the second part, mentions Aeneas’ subsequent encounter with Helen (Aeneid II, 566-587).

I try the barb upon a penciled line
Of Vergil. Nothing underneath the sun
Has bettered, Uncle, since the scaffolds flamed
On butchered Troy until Aeneas shamed
White Helen on her hams by Vesta’s shrine.

Crucial references to Virgil are to be found in a later poem entitled Falling Asleep over the Aeneid, included in his second book, The Mills of the Kavanaughs9. I could not ascertain whether this is the «monologue that started as a translation of Vergil and then was completely rewritten»10. In any case, the speaking voice, i.e. the poet, here identifies with Virgil’s Aeneas. He falls asleep and dreams of dead Pallas:
His head
Is yawning like a person. The plumes blow;
The beard and eyebrows ruffle. Face of snow,
You are the flower that country girls have caught,
A wild bee-pillaged honey-suckle brought
To the returning bridegroom – the design
Has not yet left it, and the petals shine;
The earth, its mother, has, at last, no help:
it is itself.

This one passage conflates two Virgilian passages, while adding some pictorial details: the yawning head, the pillaging bees, the spousal context: Ipse caput nivei fultum Pallantis et ora
(Aeneid XI, 39)

And
Hic iuvenem agresti sublimem stramine ponunt:
Qualem virgineo demessum pollice florem
Seu mollis violae seu languentis hyacinthi,
Cui neque fulgor adhuc nec dum sua forma recessit,
Non iam mater alit tellus virisque ministrat.
(Aeneid XI, 67-71)

As is clear from this brief quotation, Lowell tends to expand Virgilian elements into full, pathetic descriptions: nivei, a simple adjective, becomes «face of snow». His reworking of the original aims at the poignant and decorative. Other central elements of Lowell’s poem appear to derive from, and enhance emotionally, Virgilian details: the feathers – a recurrent element throughout the first part of the poem – are probably reminiscent of the cristas in line 8 and «the bird with Dido’s sworded breast» is Pallas’ own «levique patens in pectore volnus» in line 40.
The same is true of the rest of Lowell’s poem:

But I take his pall,
Stiff with its gold and purple, and recall
How Dido hugged it to her, while she toiled,
Laughing – her golden threads, a serpent coiled
In cypress. Now I lay it like a sheet;
It clinks and settles down upon his feet,
The careless yellow hair that seemed to burn
Beforehand.

Compare this to

Tum geminas vestes auroque ostroque rigentis,
Extulit Aeneas, quas illi laeta laborum
Ipsa suis quondam manibus sidonia Dido
Fecerat et tenui telas discreverat auro.
Harum unam iuveni supremum maestus honorem
Induit arsurasque comas obnubit amictu.
(Aeneid XI, 72-77)

It is such passages that most reveal, and correspond to, Lowell’s sensibility, encapsulating his sense of the epic – passages in which the epic hero is not just a vehicle and source of historical memory, but proves to have his own memories. Aeneas’ identity mixes universal history with remembrances of his private life. Throughout the poem Aeneas fulfills a double task: remembering and making himself worth remembering.
One more section of Lowell’s poem appears to follow closely Virgil’s poem:

my marshals fetch
His squire, Acoetes, white with age, to hitch
Aethon, the hero’s charger, and its ears
Prick, and it steps and steps, and stately tears
Lather its teeth; and then the harlots bring
The hero’s charms and baton – but the King,
Vain-glorious Turnus, carried off the rest.
«I was myself, but Ares thought it best
The way it happened.» At the end of time,
He sets his spear, as my descendants climb
The knees of Father Time, his beard of scalps.
His scythe, the arc of steel that crowns the Alps.
The elephants of Carthage hold those snows,
Turms of Numidian horse unsling their bows,
The flaming turkey-feathered arrows swarm
Beyond the Alps «Pallas», I raise my arm
And shout, «Brother, eternal health. Farewell
Forever».

Virgil says:
Ducitur infelix aevo confectus Acoetes,
Pectora nunc foedans pugnis, nunc unguibus ora;
Sternitur et toto proiectus corpore terrae.
Ducunt et Rutulo perfusos sanguine currus.
Post bellator ecus, positis insignibus, Aethon
It lacrimans guttisque umectat grandibus ora.
Hastam alii galeamque ferunt; nam cetera Turnus
Victor habet. Tum maesta phalanx Teucrique secuntur
Tyrrhenique omnes et versis Arcades armis.
Postquam omnis longe comitum processerat ordo,
Substitit Aeneas gemituque haec addidit alto:
Nos alias hinc ad lacrimas eadem horrida belli
Fata vocant: salve aeternum mihi, maxume Palla,
Aeternumque vale.
(Aeneid XI, 85-98)

As is evident, Lowell rendered quite faithfully Virgil’s text, but inserted some lines that make the English passage sound quite different from the Latin subtext. These lines predict the Punic wars and, by linking the present to the future, open up a perspective of further death and massive destruction. The statement «I was myself» eerily echoes «it is itself» referring to the earth further up in the poem. However subtly, this echo emphasizes the tragic core of Lowell’s epic vision. Only nature keeps its own identity and cannot be changed by history – not even when its children are killed. On the contrary, the human individual, Aeneas, is at the mercy of historical change and is caused to regard his life as progressive selfbetrayal. «I was myself» nostalgically looks back on obliterated origins, splicing the present with the past of deluded expectations.
The whole of Pallas’ funeral creatively rewrites Virgil’s text – which is typical of Lowell’s translating method. This poem, up to a certain point, may well be considered a translation in its own right and be legitimately included in Imitations, Lowell’s free versions of western poets, from antiquity to modern times. Interestingly enough, with all his admiration for Latin poets, Lowell did not include any of them in Imitations, while he distributed translations of Propertius, Horace, Virgil, Catullus, Juvenal, and others throughout his original work. On the other hand, one should notice that the first text of Imitations is an epic passage – an excerpt of the Iliad, the slaughter of Lykaon by Achilles, which is thematically akin to the episode of Pallas’ death.
In the closing lines of Falling Asleep, the poet awakes and ceases to identify with the Trojan hero. Now he finds himself back in his childhood, witnessing another funeral: his uncle’s.

It all comes back. My Uncle Charles appears,
Blue-capped and bird-like.

Virgil shades off into literature. Yet, he projects the timelessness of his vicissitudes onto the account of the modern poet’s own life.
Falling Asleep marks a highly significant passage from literature to life, from epic to autobiography, from heroes to relatives – a passage foreboding, actually enabling the revolution of Lowell’s Life Studies. In the name of Virgil the public and the private, the objective and the subjective meet. Indeed, the private and the subjective prove public enough as to acquire a universal function – one that Seamus Heaney called «the role of the poet as conscience»11. As is evident from Falling Asleep, Lowell’s confessionalism is rooted in the sublime. His autobiography has claims to imperial status. In his essay Art and Evil (1955-56), Lowell, pinpointing the essence of the epic, also gave us a succinct definition of his own poetry. «Aeneas, in tearing himself away from Dido, comes to know the full torture of seeming to be, of all but believing himself to be cold, dead, calculating, serpentine. The Aeneid is perhaps like Proust’s novel, the story of what one must give up to write a book». Lowell is clearly speaking for himself. The epic hero, i.e. the epic poet, converts life into writing – which is exactly what Lowell meant to accomplish in his Life Studies.
Interestingly enough, the title of Life Studies’s first poem, Beyond the Alps, quotes Falling Asleep: «The elephants of Carthage hold those snows, / Turms of Numidian horse unsling their bows, / The flaming turkey-feathered arrows swarm / Beyond the Alps [my italics]». The poet established a strong textual link between the past and the present of his work. Only seemingly did he cease to dream of the epic and waken to reality. In fact, reality itself took a Virgilian resonance. The poem Beyond the Alps was to turn up – slightly modified – in one of Lowell’s subsequent collections, On the Union Dead, stressing the centrality of the Virgilian theme and assuring continuity to the whole of Lowell’s work in the name of epic.
Finally, what does this theme signify? To put it shortly, the evil of history. We have already seen the reference to wars in Falling Asleep and in The Death of the Sheriff. In Beyond the Alps, one finds a pithy summary of all major human tribulations: fascism and temporal power (Mussolini, in the first stanza), mass superstition and religious power (Mary’s Assumption dogma and the pope, in the second stanza), civil wars, dictatorship, and exile (as expressed by Ovid’s biography, in the third stanza), political murder («killer kings on an Etruscan cup», in the closing couplet).
Through Virgil, Lowell voices a subtle critique of power and imperialism, while fashioning a catastrophic image of human history as onslaught and massacre – an image recurring also in his letters to the presidents of the U.S.. In 1943, he wrote to Roosevelt:

In 1941 we undertook a patriotic war to preserve our lives, our fortunes, and our sacred honor against the lawless aggressions of a totalitarian league: in 1943 we are collaborating with the most unscrupulous and powerful of totalitarian dictators to destroy law, freedom, democracy, and above all, our continued national sovereignty.

He then went to jail as a conscientious objector.
In 1965 he wrote to Lyndon Johnson:

We are in danger of imperceptibly becoming an explosive and suddenly chauvinistic nation, and may even be drifting on our way to the last nuclear ruin. I know it is hard for the responsible man to act; it is also painful for the private and irresolute man to dare criticism12.

A disciple of Virgil, Lowell stated his need for criticism, while also taking a dramatic step away from Virgil’s epic passiveness as embodied by Aeneas’s compliance with the divine order to fight a deplorable war. It is exactly a lack of divine justification that prevents Lowell’s epic world from achieving coherence. By both remaining loyal to his ideals of epic involvement in history and questioning Virgil’s suggestions as to how this involvement should occur, Lowell expressed a deeply unsetting conflict, and the ultimate impossibility of compromise, between political obligations and poetic independence – an impossibility which the conclusion of Falling Asleep fixes in an image of reverberating ambiguity:

the bust
Of young Augustus weighs on Virgil’s shelf:
It scowls into my glasses at itself.

The final line, with imagistic preciseness, captures the poet’s moral complexity and controversial role, while suggesting that he cannot but follow the power’s pull. Obedience and rebellion cannot be told from one another. Augustus’ eyes are reflected on the poet’s. They seem to be scowling at themselves. In fact, they don’t see at all. They don’t have a vision of their own, but see through the poet’s vision. Those glasses are a successful metaphor for the ultimate correspondence and interchangeability of the poet’s and the emperor’s sights. Finally, there is only one who sees, the poet. But his sight is double – which means that he can see with his own eyes but his eyes can only see what the others, i.e. political power, makes or lets them see. Also, the intermediation of a mechanic tool (the glasses), while apparently permitting vision and reciprocity of vision, in reality means defective sight. Whoever sees here does not see well. All epic attempts are nipped in the bud by the impossibility of independent vision. No fruitful collaboration between poetry and politics is permitted. Indeed, poetry asserts itself against politics, leaving the poet with very little to hope for.

*

Lowell’s epic regrets run as far in his work as his last book, Day by Day. The very incipit is literally reminiscent of Virgil’s text: «Myrmidons, Spartans, soldier of dire Ulysses... / Why should I renew his infamous sorrow?» (Ulysses and Circe, I, 4-5). Line 4 is totally obscure if one does not recognize Aeneid II, 7:

Quis talia fando
Myrmidonum Dolopumve aut duri miles Ulixi
Temperet a lacrimis?

Aeneas is telling Dido that nobody, not even the cruelest person, could refrain from weeping if asked to tell his mishaps. This quotation subtly makes out a case for the modern poet’s painful unease with autobiographical poetry, while conferring on him and on his poem, also on account of its position in both texts, a patently epic status. This is very much in the wake of Lowell’s Virgilian calling. However, the imitative strategy – i.e. the abrupt interpolation of ancient texts – seems quite unusual in Lowell’s imitative writing and rather reminds us of Pound’s method in the Cantos or of Eliot’s in the Waste Land. In fact, we may well regard such an unexpected device in Day by Day as a late tribute to the major promoters of American epic in modern times. Lowell’s epic project, Virgilian as it appears, could not fail to define itself according and/or in opposition to that of other American poets: Walt Whitman, Hart Crane, Ezra Pound, T.S. Eliot, and William Carlos Williams. In fact, as J.D. McClatchy showed, evident differences notwithstanding, Lowell owed quite a lot to Pound’s notion of the epic:

he did share with Pound a purgatorial sense of human history – one that the modern epic must pass through. Like Pound, he perceived time as a stalled machine, a tone cluster of states of mind across the centuries, darkened by madness, lust, ambition, age, the arrogance and intoxication of power – as Lowell’s own mind had been darkened in his time13.

Line 5 of Ulysses and Circe continues to quote Aeneas’ address to queen Dido: Infandum regina iubes renovare dolorem. Lowell has put on Aeneas’ mask once again – as in the old lines of Falling Asleep over the Aeneid. In his late essay on Epics, written at the same time as Day by Day, he considers Aeneas «subject to heartfelt depression». Nonetheless, «he thinks little, thinks up little». Obviously, Lowell believes depression to be a prerequisite of creation. To be sure – Lowell is ready to admit – «Aeneas has a moment or two of imagination and clairvoyance». I.e.: he is a decent poet, especially in «his hallucinated and almost surrealist narrative of the fall of Troy in Book Two – dust, smoke, butchery, deceit, terror, the annihilation of his home and city. Some authentic murmur in Aeneas’s voice makes us unwilling to believe this book was ghostwritten by Vergil »14. Now we understand even better the meaning of that Virgilian quote right at the beginning of Day by Day,. Lowell identifies with Aeneas but, at the same time, once more, he questions his exemplarity, striking him the same way he, as a young man, struck his father: «Aeneas is sometimes swollen and Rubensesque, as if painted for the peaceful triumphs of Marie de’ Medici – I wish he were greater and had more charm». By comparing him to Eliot’s Prufrock in the subsequent passage, he finally appears to set the seal both on Virgil’s and on his own epic failure.
In close, the imitation of Virgil makes the poet’s life, as represented by autobiographical memory, and historical evil, as represented by literary memory, one thing. The autobiographical subject turns out to be but a replica of a universal one endlessly striving for self-fulfillment and constantly failing to achieve his end. For Lowell, as McClatchy put it, the past is «a model at once diachronic in format and synchronic in theme». Lowell’s epic writing «provides a compelling example of personal consciousness as a register of the common past, and stay against historical contingency»15. Contingency finally got the upper hand on life itself.
NOTE


1 R. Lowell, An Interview with Frederick Seidel, in Collected Prose, ed. R. Giroux, New York, Farrar Straus & Giroux, 1987, p. 253.
2 See on the relation of Lowell’s poetry and state issues D. Eddins, Poet and State in the Verse of Robert Lowell, in Robert Lowell, ed. H. Bloom, New York-Philadelphia, 1987, pp. 41-57.
3 Dea Roma in Lord Weary’s Castle is one of Lowell’s earliest and most programmatic Roman texts. Its ideological centrality is underlined by its being positioned between a poem titled Crucifix and a translation of Propertius, The Ghost. Another translation of Propertius is to be found in Lowell’s very last book, Day by Day. Translations of Horace and Juvenal occur in Near the Ocean. Catullus’ carmen L is loosely but clearly imitated in Day by Day (Morning After Dining with a Friend).
4 J.D. McClatchy, Robert Lowell. History and Epic, in White Paper. On Contemporary American Poetry, New York, Columbia UP, 1989, p. 137. Lowell’s translation of Quevedo’s celebrated sonnet on the ruins of Rome, included in Near the Ocean, provides a further instance of Lowell’s obsession with grand schemes of historical decline.
5 D. Eddins, Poet and State in the Verse of Robert Lowell, in Robert Lowell, ed. H. Bloom, New York-Philadelphia, 1987, p. 46.
6 T.S. Eliot, What is a Classic?, in Selected Prose of T. S. Eliot, ed. F. Kermode, New York, Farrar Straus & Giroux, 1975, pp. 122, 128-9.
7 J.D. McClatchy, Robert Lowell. History and Epic, in White Paper. On Contemporary American Poetry, New York, Columbia UP, 1989, p. 131.
8 R. Lowell, An Interview with Frederick Seidel..., p. 255.
9See T. Ziolkowski, Virgil and the moderns, Princeton, N. J., Princeton University Press, 1993, pp. 178-181. In particular: «Although the poem eschews all editorial comment, Lowell has chosen with great precision the passage that enables him, the conscientious objector in World War II (and the later antiwar protester during the 1960s), to examine his own ambivalent attitude toward war [...] the designated passage from the Aeneid present war in its full horror, embracing as it does both the death of the innocent young and the brutal slaughter of prisoners» (p. 179).
10 R. Lowell, An Interview with Frederick Seidel..., p.254.
11 S. Heaney, Lowell’s Command, in The Government of the Tongue, New York, Farrar Straus & Goiroux, 1988, p. 130.
12 R. Lowell, Public Letters to Two Presidents, in Collected Prose, ed. R. Giroux, New York, Farrar Straus & Giroux, 1987, pp. 370- 1. On the different meaning of this second refusal see S. Heaney, , Lowell’s Command, in The Government of the Tongue, New York, Farrar Straus & Goiroux, 1988, pp. 129-147.
13 J.D. McClatchy, Robert Lowell. History and Epic, in White Paper. On Contemporary American Poetry, New York, Columbia UP, 1989, p. 134.
14 R. Lowell, Epics, in Collected Prose, ed. R. Giroux, New York, Farrar Straus & Giroux, 1987, p. 220.
15 J.D. McClatchy, Robert Lowell. History and Epic, in White Paper. On Contemporary American Poetry, New York, Columbia UP, 1989, pp. 129-130.
L’amore per i classici antichi invade tutta l’opera di Robert Lowell. Del suo classicismo egli è certamente debitore a Pound e a Eliot. Tuttavia egli non arrivò mai a quelle virtuosistiche contaminazioni tra antico e moderno che sono tipiche di quei due maestri. Nella scrittura di Lowell la ripresa dell’antico non significa sperimentazione avanguardistica. L’io lowelliano – esperienziale, non sperimentale – ha sempre concepito la scrittura in termini di autoespressione. Per quanto debole, non ha mai affidato alla scrittura il compito di rappresentare la poesia al suo posto, ma ha sempre usato la poesia per rappresentare se stesso. Nessuna impersonalità, dunque – mentre proprio all’impersonalità dello stile miravano Eliot e Pound attraverso l’invenzione di una scrittura diacronica, che includesse Ovidio, Catullo, Shakespeare etc. Lowell mantiene integri i suoi modelli.
Non li dissemina per il testo, perché gli servono per difendersi dal senso della sua provvisorietà. Su quale presupposto teorico si nutriva il classicismo di Lowell? In un’Intervista a Frederick Seidel del 1961 ha dichiarato:
un poeta romano è molto meno intellettuale di un inglese, molto meno astratto. È, in qualche modo, più vicino alla natura [...] Eppure è molto sofisticato. [...] Prendi un qualunque bravo poeta romano – Giovenale, Virgilio, Properzio, Catullo– è molto più grezzo e diretto di qualunque cosa in inglese e lo stesso ha una tenuta marmorea [block-like formality]. Mi interessa la franchezza romana1.
Queste poche e semplici parole, a ben vedere, pronunciano un non facile tentativo di sintesi culturale – tra il modernismo di Pound, che aveva a sua volta apprezzato i latini per la loro forza espressiva, e il romanticismo della tradizione inglese, che del ritorno alla natura aveva fatto il suo programma.
Tra i poeti antichi Virgilio è stato sicuramente quello che più ha influenzato e modellato l’opera e la personalità poetica di Lowell. Nel nome di Virgilio l’americano Lowell ha cercato di interpretare il grande mito di Roma e di indagare, in rapporto a questo, le due questioni che più lo hanno tormentato nel corso della sua vita: la missione morale del poeta e la responsabilità storica dello stato. Per Lowell la stessa America è una sorta di impero romano – immensa, volgare, vitale, potentissima e bisognosa di poeti per giustificare la sua corruzione e contenere la sua decadenza.
Rome asked for poets. At her beck and call,
came Lucan, Tacitus and Juvenal ...

[Roma richiedeva poeti. Al suo comando
vennero Lucano, Tacito e Giovenale ...]

Sono versi della poesia Beyond the Alps, inclusa sia in Life Studies (1959) sia in For the Union Dead (1964). È interessante notare che nella versione riveduta del libro più tardo questi versi sono pronunciati da Ovidio, una ben nota vittima della propaganda imperiale. Attraverso Ovidio il poeta moderno critica l’ipocrisia della madrepatria, colpevole di nascondere il suo militarismo attraverso la promozione culturale.
Virgilio, più ancora di Ovidio, incarna per Lowell il difficile equilibrio tra creazione e costrizione, tra storia e autobiografia. Lowell, di fronte a Virgilio, si è sentito ugualmente ‘epico’ – cioè ugualmente tragico e messianico. Di creare un’epica moderna, che, riprendendo Virgilio, fosse capace di competere con altri progetti di epica americana (Whitman, Carlos Williams, Pound), Lowell si è preoccupato fin da ragazzo. A diciott’anni scrisse il suo primo saggio sulla forma epica, in particolare sull’Iliade – che fu pubblicato sul giornale della scuola. Quand’era ancora studente, diede mano a un poema lungo sulla prima crociata. Poco prima di morire stava lavorando a un saggio intitolato Epics.
Virgilio compare già nel suo primo libro, Lord Weary’s Castle (1946). Qui la poesia The Death of the Sheriff è introdotta da un verso dell’Eneide (II, 506) – che rimanda al drammatico episodio del massacro di Priamo: forsitan et Priami fuerint quae fata, requiras? Nella seconda parte della poesia, si trova un riferimento all’incontro di Enea con Elena (Eneide II, 566-587).

I try the barb upon a penciled line
Of Vergil. Nothing underneath the sun
Has bettered, Uncle, since the scaffolds flamed
On butchered Troy until Aeneas shamed
White Helen on her hams by Vesta’s shrine.

[Provo l’uncino su un verso di Virgilio
sottolineato a matita. Niente è migliorato
sotto il sole, Zio, da quando le impalcature bruciarono
su Troia macellata finché Enea svergognò
la bianca Elena accucciata presso il tempio di Vesta.]

Riferimenti cruciali a Virgilio si trovano in una poesia successiva, Falling Asleep over the Aeneid, compresa nel secondo libro, The Mills of the Kavanaughs (1951) – vero e proprio punto di svolta nella storia artistica e umana di Lowell. Il poeta, addormentatosi durante la lettura dell’Eneide, sogna di essere Enea davanti a Pallante morto:
His head
Is yawning like a person. The plumes blow;
The beard and eyebrows ruffle. Face of snow,
You are the flower that country girls have caught,
A wild bee-pillaged honey-suckle brought
To the returning bridegroom – the design
Has not yet left it, and the petals shine;
The earth, its mother, has, at last, no help:
it is itself.

[La sua testa
sbadiglia come vivo. Le piume volano,
la barba e le sopracciglia si arruffano. Viso di neve,
tu sei il fiore che le ragazze di campagna hanno colto,
un caprifoglio selvatico saccheggiato dalle api, portato
allo sposo che torna – la forma
non l’ha ancora lasciato, e i petali risplendono;
la terra, sua madre, infine non può aiutarlo:
è se stessa.]
Questo passo combina due passi virgiliani (Eneide XI, 39 e 67-71), aggiungendo qualche particolare pittorico: la testa che sbadiglia, le api che saccheggiano, il contesto coniugale. Lowell tende chiaramente a espandere gli elementi virgiliani in descrizioni patetiche: nivei, un semplice aggettivo, diventa «face of snow». La riscrittura dell’originale punta verso il sentimentale e il decorativo. Altri importanti elementi della poesia loweliana valorizzano emotivamente particolari virgiliani: le piume – che ritornano in tutta la prima parte della poesia – sono probabilmente una ripresa di cristas al verso 8 e «the bird with Dido’s sworded breast» riprende «levique patens in pectore volnus», riferito a Pallante, al verso line 40.
Lo stesso vale per il resto della poesia:

But I take his pall,
Stiff with its gold and purple, and recall
How Dido hugged it to her, while she toiled,
Laughing – her golden threads, a serpent coiled
In cypress. Now I lay it like a sheet;
It clinks and settles down upon his feet,
The careless yellow hair that seemed to burn
Beforehand.

[Ma io prendo il suo mantello,
rigido d’oro e di porpora, e ricordo
come Didone se lo stringeva a sé, mentre lavorava,
ridendo – i suoi fili d’oro un serpente attorcigliato
nel lino di batista. Ora lo stendo come un lenzuolo;
fruscia e si adagia sui suoi piedi,
sui trascurati capelli biondi che sembravano bruciare
anzitempo.]

Il corrispondente passo dell’Eneide (XI, 72-77) dice più o meno le stesse cose. Sono simili passi quelli che più rivelano la sensibilità di Lowell ed esprimono più profondamente la sua idea di epica – passi in cui l’eroe epico non è solo un veicolo e una fonte di memoria storica, ma dimostra di avere sue proprie memorie. Nell’identità di Enea sono mischiati storia universale e ricordi privati. Per tutto il poema Enea assolve una duplice funzione: quella di ricordare e di rendere se stesso degno di essere ricordato.
Un altro passo della poesia lowelliana segue da vicino il testo virgiliano:

my marshals fetch
His squire, Acoetes, white with age, to hitch
Aethon, the hero’s charger, and its ears
Prick, and it steps and steps, and stately tears
Lather its teeth; and then the harlots bring
The hero’s charms and baton – but the King,
Vain-glorious Turnus, carried off the rest.
«I was myself, but Ares thought it best
The way it happened.» At the end of time,
He sets his spear, as my descendants climb
The knees of Father Time, his beard of scalps.
His scythe, the arc of steel that crowns the Alps.
The elephants of Carthage hold those snows,
Turms of Numidian horse unsling their bows,
The flaming turkey-feathered arrows swarm
Beyond the Alps. «Pallas», I raise my arm
And shout, «Brother, eternal health. Farewell
Forever».

[i miei aiutanti vanno a prendere
il suo scudiero, Acete, bianco d’anni, per attaccare
Etone, il destriero dell’eroe, e le sue orecchie
si drizzano e zampa e zampa e nobili lacrime
schiumano sui suoi denti; e poi le concubine portano
gli amuleti dell’eroe e il suo bastone – ma il Re,
il vanaglorioso Turno, si portò via il resto.
«Io ero io, ma Ares volle che le cose
andassero così.» Al termine del tempo
egli pianta la lancia, mentre i miei discendenti scalano
i ginocchi del Padre Tempo, la sua barba di scalpi,
la sua falce, l’arco d’acciaio che corona le Alpi.
Gli elefanti di Cartagine occupano quelle nevi,
torme di cavalieri numidi allentano i loro archi,
le fiammanti frecce con piume di tacchino sciamano
al di là delle Alpi. «Pallante,» levo il braccio
e grido, «Fratello, salute eterna. Addio
per sempre».]

Lowell, qui, traduce Eneide XI, 85-98 abbastanza fedelmente, se non che ha inserito alcuni versi che danno alla poesia un significato alquanto diverso da quello del suo modello. Sono i versi che predicono le guerre puniche e, legando il presente al futuro, aprono una prospettiva di morte e di distruzione ulteriore. L’affermazione «I was myself» richiama «it is itself», riferito, sopra, alla terra. Per quanto fievolmente, quest’eco mostra il nucleo sconsolato dell’epicità lowelliana. Solo la natura mantiene la sua identità e non può essere mutata dalla storia – neppure quando i suoi figli sono uccisi. Al contrario, l’individuo umano, Enea, è alla mercé dei mutamenti storici e non può che considerare la sua vita un progressivo autotradimento. «I was myself» getta uno sguardo nostalgico su origini obliterate, lega il presente al passato di attese deluse.
Tutto l’episodio del funerale di Pallante è una riscrittura del testo virgiliano, affine a quelle che Lowell ha incluso nel libro Imitations (1961): versioni libere di poeti occidentali, dall’antichità all’età moderna. È notevole che, con tutta la sua ammirazione per i poeti latini, Lowell non ne includa uno solo in Imitations, mentre ha distribuito traduzioni di Properzio,Orazio, Virgilio, Catullo, Giovenale e altri nei suoi propri libri di poesia. D’altra parte, va sottolineato che il primo testo di Imitations è un passo epico – tratto dall’Iliade: Licaone massacrato da Achille, che fa venire in mente, per affinità tematica, Pallante massacrato da Turno.
Nei versi finali di Falling Asleep il poeta si sveglia e smette di identificarsi con l’eroe troiano. Adesso si ritrova bambino, a un altro funerale, quello di suo zio:

It all comes back. My Uncle Charles appears,
Blue-capped and bird-like.

[Tutto ritorna. Lo zio Charles appare,
con un berretto azzurro, come un uccello.]

Questa volta Virgilio sfuma davvero nelle lontananze del sogno. Eppure proietta la sua ombra atemporale sulla storia del poeta moderno. Falling Asleep segna un importante passaggio dalla letteratura alla vita vissuta, dall’epica all’autobiografia, dagli eroi ai parenti – un passaggio che prelude, addirittura apre la strada alla rivoluzione dei Life Studies. Nel nome di Virgilio il pubblico e il privato, l’oggettivo e il soggettivo si incontrano. Anzi, il privato e il soggettivo si rivelano abbastanza pubblici da acquisire una funzione universale – quella che Seamus Heaney ha chiamato «the role of the poet as conscience»2.
Falling Asleep mostra chiaramente che il confessionalismo di Lowell ha le sue radici nel sublime, ambisce a uno status imperiale. Nel saggio Art and Evil (1955-56), Lowell, cercando di definire l’essenza dell’epica, ha dato anche una sintetica definizione della propria poesia:
Enea, strappandosi da Didone, apprende la tortura di sembrare ma non di credere d’essere freddo, morto, calcolatore, infido. L’Eneide è forse come il romanzo di Proust la storia di quello che si deve cedere per scrivere un libro.
Lowell sta parlando di sé. L’eroe epico, cioè il poeta epico, converte la vita in scrittura – che è esattamente quello che Lowell intende fare nei Life Studies. Il titolo della prima poesia dei Life Studies, Beyond the Alps, è una citazione di Falling Asleep: «The elephants of Carthage hold those snows, / Turms of Numidian horse unsling their bows, / The flaming turkey-feathered arrows swarm / Beyond the Alps [mio corsivo]». Questa citazione getta un ponte tra il passato e il presente dell’opera lowelliana. Se si considera, poi, che Beyond the Alps deve ricomparire, leggermente modificata, in On the Union Dead – come si è già detto – capiamo quale continuità abbia il tema virgiliano nella poesia di Lowell e quale funzione di raccordo esso abbia tra le sue varie fasi.
In conclusione, qual è il senso di questo tema? Il male della storia. Abbiamo già visto i riferimenti alle guerre in Falling Asleep e in The Death of the Sheriff. In Beyond the Alps si trova un denso sommario delle maggiori sciagure umane: il fascismo e il potere temporale (Mussolini nella prima strofa), le superstizione di massa e il potere religioso (il dogma dell’assunsione di Maria e il papa nella seconda), le guerre civili, la dittatura e l’esilio (Ovidio nella terza), l’omicidio politico («killer kings on an Etruscan cup» nel distico finale).
Attraverso Virgilio Lowell articola una sottile critica del potere e dell’imperialismo, riconoscendo nel massacro e nella distruzione l’immagine più veritiera della storia umana. Questa è l’immagine che troviamo anche in due celebri lettere che Lowell diresse ai presidenti americani. A Roosevelt, nel 1943, scrisse:

Nel 1941 abbiamo intrapreso una Guerra patriottica per proteggere le nostre vite, le nostre fortune e il nostro sacro onore dalla aggressioni illegali del totalitarismo: nel 1943 stiamo collaborando con i più spregiudicati e potenti dittatori per distruggere la legge, la libertà, la democrazia e soprattutto la nostra sovranità nazionale.

Quindi finì in galera per obiezione di coscienza.
In 1965 scrisse a Lyndon Johnson:

Stiamo correndo il rischio di diventare senza accorgercene una nazione esplosiva e improvvisamente sciovinista, e può anche essere che stiamo scivolando verso l’ultima rovina nucleare. So che è difficile per l’uomo responsabile agire, è anche doloroso per l’uomo privato e irresoluto tentare una forma di critica3.
Da bravo discepolo di Virgilio, Lowell ha affermato il suo bisogno di critica, ma al tempo stesso si è anche discostato energicamente dalla passività epica di cui Virgilio si è fatto banditore impegnando il suo Enea in una guerra odiosa per rispetto di un comando superiore. Lowell, infine, ha espresso un irresolubile conflitto, un’impossibilità ultima di compromesso tra dovere politico e indipendenza poetica, e ha fissato questa impossibilità nell’ambigua immagine con cui si chiude Falling Asleep:

the bust Of young Augustus weighs on Virgil’s shelf:
It scowls into my glasses at itself.

[il busto
del giovane Augusto pesa sullo scaffale di Virgilio:
torvo egli si guarda nei miei occhiali.]

L’ultimo verso cattura, con precisione imagistica, la complessità morale del poeta e il suo controverso ruolo, suggerendo che egli non può far altro che seguire le imposizioni del potere. L’obbedienza e la ribellione sono indistinguibili. Gli occhi di Augusto si riflettono su quelli del poeta, guardandosi. Sembrano torvi. In realtà, non vedono affatto. Non hanno una loro vista, ma vedono attraverso la vista del poeta. Quegli occhiali riflettenti sono una felice metafora dell’intrinseca interscambiabilità tra occhi del poeta e occhi dell’imperatore. Alla fine, solo uno vede, e costui è il poeta. Ma la sua vista è doppia – che significa che egli può vedere con i suoi occhi ma questi occhi possono vedere solo quello che gli altri, cioè il potere politico, permette o impone loro di vedere. Inoltre, l’intermediazione di uno strumento meccanico, gli occhiali, mentre sembra favorire la vista e la reciprocità delle viste, in realtà significa mancanza di vista. Chiunque sia qui colui che vede o deve vedere, vede male. Qualunque tentativo di epica risulta stroncato dall’impossibilità di una vista indipendente. Nessuna collaborazione è ammissibile tra poesia e politica. Anzi, la poesia si afferma contro la politica, lasciando al poeta – ormai definitivamente sveglio – ben poche speranze.

*

Le nostalgie epiche di Lowell affiorano fin nel suo ultimo libro, Day by Day (1977). L’incipit stesso è un richiamo letterale a Virgilio: «Myrmidons, Spartans, soldier of dire Ulysses... / Why should I renew his infamous sorrow?» (Ulysses and Circe, I, 4-5). Il verso 4 è del tutto incomprensibile se non vi si riconosce Eneide II, 7:

Quis talia fando
Myrmidonum Dolopumve aut duri miles Ulixi
Temperet a lacrimis?

Enea sta dicendo a Didone che nessuno, neppure l’essere più crudele, potrebbe impedirsi di piangere se costretto a raccontare le sue disavventure. Questa citazione sottolinea la difficoltà con cui il poeta moderno racconta la sua vita, ma al tempo stesso, anche per la sua posizione incipitaria, conferisce al racconto di quella vita dignità epica. La strategia imitativa, qui – l’inserimento dissimulato di un sottotesto antico nella scrittura moderna –, ricorda più che la maniera del Lowell classicista la tecnica di Pound o di Eliot. Possiamo considerare questo strano incipit un tardivo omaggio del poeta stanco e deluso ai maggiori poeti epici dell’America e dei tempi moderni. In effetti, come è stato notato, Lowell doveva non poco alle nozioni epiche di Pound:

Come Pound, egli percepiva il tempo come un [...] raggruppamento di stati mentali che attraversa i secoli, oscurato dalla follia, della lussuria, dall’ambizione, dalla vecchiaia, dall’arroganza e dall’ebbrezza del potere4.

Il verso 5 di Ulysses and Circe cita un famoso verso che Enea rivolse a Didone: Infandum regina iubes renovare dolorem. Lowell ha indossato nuovamente la maschera di Enea, come nei vecchi versi di Falling Asleep over the Aeneid. Nel saggio sull’epica che Lowell stava scrivendo al tempo della morte Enea appare una vittima della depressione (subject to heartfelt depression). Egli «pensa poco, inventa poco». Eppure – Lowell ammette – «Enea ha un momento o due di immaginazione e di chiaroveggenza ». Insomma, è un poeta passabile, specialmente «nel racconto allucinato e quasi surrealista della caduta di Troia [...] Un mormorio autentico nella voce di Enea ci toglie la voglia di credere che questo libro sia opera di Virgilio»5.
Lowell si è identificato sì, ancora una volta, con Enea, citandolo all’inizio del libro, ma non ha affatto smesso di dubitare della sua esemplarità. Infatti, se possiamo considerarlo capace di qualche buona trovata (come la composizione del secondo libro), resta – come leggiamo nel seguito del saggio sull’epica – che lo si vorrebbe «greater and had more charm». Enea è – conclude Lowell – uguale al Prufrock di Eliot. E con questo paragone possiamo dire definitivamente crollato il sogno lowelliano di un’epica autobiografica, vale a dire di una poesia moderna definitivamente affrancata dalla contingenza e dalla caducità.

NOTE

1 R. Lowell, An Interview with Frederick Seidel, in Collected Prose, ed. R. Giroux, New York, Farrar Straus & Giroux, 1987, p. 253.
2 S. Heaney, Lowell’s Command, in The Government of the Tongue, New York, Farrar Straus & Goiroux, 1988, p. 130.
3 R. Lowell, Public Letters to Two Presidents, in Collected Prose, ed. R. Giroux, New York, Farrar Straus & Giroux, 1987, pp. 370-1.
4 J.D. McClatchy, Robert Lowell. History and Epic, in White Paper. On Contemporary American Poetry
, New York, Columbia UP, 1989, p. 134.
5 R. Lowell, Epics, in Collected Prose, ed. R. Giroux, New York, Farrar Straus & Giroux, 1987, p. 220.

¬ top of page


Iniziative
18 giugno 2018
Libri recensibili per luglio 2018

9 giugno 2018
Semicerchio al Festival di Poesia di Genova

5 giugno 2018
La liberté d'expression à l'épreuve des langues - Paris

26 maggio 2018
Slam-Poetry al PIM-FEST, Rignano

19 maggio 2018
Lingue e dialetti: PIM-FEST a Rosano

17 maggio 2018
PIM-FEST: il programma

8 maggio 2018
Mia Lecomte a Pistoia

4 maggio 2018
Incontro con Stefano Carrai

2 maggio 2018
Lezioni sulla canzone

9 aprile 2018
Scaffai: "Letteratura e Ecologia" al Vieusseux

7 aprile 2018
Reading di poesia guidato da Caterina Bigazzi

5 aprile 2018
Incontro con Eraldo Affinati

3 marzo 2018
La poesia dei nuovi italiani. Con Barbara Serdakowski, in ricordo di Hasan

2 marzo 2018
Incontro con Grazia Verasani - annullato

27 febbraio 2018
Ceppo Internazionale ad André Ughetto - Firenze 27/2 ore 16

2 febbraio 2018
Ricordo di Hasan Atiya al-Nassar-Firenze

23 gennaio 2018
Mostra riviste poesia - Firenze Marucelliana

25 dicembre 2017
Addio ad Hasan Atiya al-Nassar

15 dicembre 2017
Antonella Anedda alla scuola di "Semicerchio"

8 dicembre 2017
Semicerchio a Più Libri più Liberi

30 settembre 2017
Lettura per i 30 anni di Semicerchio

1 settembre 2017
Iscrizioni Scuola di scrittura creativa

30 agosto 2017
Festival di Poesia "Voci lontane voci sorelle" - Firenze, 30/8-6/10

25 maggio 2017
In memoria di Max Chiamenti

10 marzo 2017
La Compagnia delle poete alla scuola di Semicerchio

1 marzo 2017
30 anni di SC: lectio di Jesper Svenbro a Siena

28 febbraio 2017
30 anni di SC: dibattito sulla post-poesia a Siena

11 febbraio 2017
Ricordo di Gabriella Maleti

10 febbraio 2017
Maurizio Cucchi alla Scuola di Semicerchio

31 gennaio 2017
Volumi in recensione 2017: call for reviews

27 gennaio 2017
Antonio Moresco alla Scuola di Semicerchio

24 dicembre 2016
Bando del Premio di poesia Achmadoulina

10 dicembre 2016
Semicerchio su Bob Dylan alla Fiera di Roma

9 dicembre 2016
Incontro con Stefano Dal Bianco

25 novembre 2016
Letteratura e cinema: incontro con Massimo Gaudioso

18 novembre 2016
Incontro con Wu Ming 2 alla Scuola di Scrittura Creativa

1 novembre 2016
Addio a Remo Ceserani

13 ottobre 2016
Il Nobel per la letteratura a Bob Dylan

9 settembre 2016
Presentazione di "The Mechanic Reader" a Venezia

1 luglio 2016
La poesia italiana in prospettiva plurilingue - Paris 1 luglio 2016

10 giugno 2016
Lettura della Scuola Semicerchio alle Oblate

22 aprile 2016
Corso di sceneggiatura di film letterari

18 aprile 2016
Incontri e Agguati. Per Milo De Angelis

25 febbraio 2016
Incontro con SERGEJ ZAV’JALOV - Premio Bigongiari

11 dicembre 2015
Incontro con Nicola Lagioia

4 dicembre 2015
Incontro col narratore Giorgio Vasta

27 novembre 2015
Incontro con Alessandro Fo

13 novembre 2015
Incontro con Sauro Albisani

24 settembre 2015
La Cucina Poetica di Semicerchio a Siena

22 maggio 2014
25 anni di Scuola di Scrittura Creativa - i video

» Archivio
 » Presentazione
 » Programmi in corso
 » Corsi precedenti
 » Statuto associazione
 » Scrittori e poeti
 » Blog
 » Forum
 » Audio e video lezioni
 » Materiali didattici
Editore
Pacini Editore
Distributore
PDE
Semicerchio è pubblicata col patrocinio del Dipartimento di Teoria e Documentazione delle Tradizioni Culturali dell'Università di Siena viale Cittadini 33, 52100 Arezzo, tel. +39-0575.926314, fax +39-0575.926312
web design: Gianni Cicali

Semicerchio, piazza Leopoldo 9, 50134 Firenze - tel./fax +39 055 495398